Terrestrial dispersal of juvenile Mink Frog (Lithobates septentrionalis) in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario

Authors

  • David L. LeGros Ontario Parks, Algonquin Provincial Park
  • David Lesbarrères
  • Brad Steinberg

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.22621/cfn.v135i1.2607

Keywords:

Mink Frog, Lithobates septentrionalis, dispersal, riparian habitat, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario.

Abstract

Dispersal following metamorphosis is critical for sustaining anuran metapopulations. Mink Frog (Lithobates septentrionalis) is a primarily aquatic species that is common in eastern Canada. The species is not well studied, and little is known about the terrestrial dispersal of recently metamorphosed individuals. Here we present our observations on the phenology of terrestrial activity in recently metamorphosed Mink Frogs in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Despite a sampling effort of over 26 000 trap nights over two years (2010 and 2011) in an area with a known population of Mink Frogs, we observed only 35 individuals, all of which were recent metamorphs, in late summer 2011, suggesting annual variability of recruitment. Because all Mink Frogs were observed in a riparian area, it is likely that this species uses riparian corridors to disperse toward other wetlands, thus avoiding forested areas.

Published

2021-06-23

Issue

Section

Articles