Habitat use by Veery (Catharus fuscescens) in southern Ontario

Authors

  • Connor Hawey University of Guelph
  • Paul Harpley
  • Rob Milne Wilfrid Laurier University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.22621/cfn.v134i4.2239

Keywords:

Catharus fuscescens, nesting habitat, habitat use, Veery

Abstract

Veery (Catharus fuscescens) is a breeding migrant thrush that nests throughout much of the temperate forests within Canada. Habitat loss and degradation is thought to be responsible for a steady decline in Veery populations since 1970. We studied habitat characteristics of occupied Veery territories versus unoccupied adjacent areas in southern Ontario during the 2016 breeding season. Occupied territories were characterized as riparian deciduous forests dominated by ash (Fraxinus spp.), Black Cherry (Prunus serotina), and Red Maple (Acer rubrum) trees with an understorey of Balsam Fir (Abies balsamea) and ferns (order Polypodiales); the presence of fruit-producing plants such as Riverbank Grape (Vitis riparia) and Bunchberry (Cornus canadensis) also was important.

Author Biographies

Connor Hawey, University of Guelph

Master of Environmental Sciences Student, School of Environmental Sciences

Rob Milne, Wilfrid Laurier University

Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies

Published

2021-03-12

Issue

Section

Articles